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Showing Through Real World Issues

We have a real treat today! Welcome back to Annette Schottenfeld whose second picture book, OBI’S MUD BATH, just released with Clear Fork Publishing. Several stories are crafted from our own family experiences such as Annette’s March release entitled NOT SO FAST, MAX: A ROSH HASHANAH VISIT WITH GRANDMA, and global issues that take hold our hearts such as OBI’S MUD BATH. Annette, welcome back and congratulations on your second release!

AS: Hi Tina! I’m thrilled to be here.

TS: Obi is such a lovable and endearing character. The reader finds himself rooting for Obi from the beginning. How did you develop Obi’s character traits?

AS: Thank you Tina! When writing OBI’S MUD BATH, I wanted readers to genuinely care about the main character and his problem. After reading many picture books and making note of what drew me in, I worked on creating a voice for Obi that would tug at readers’ hearts. My goal was for the little rhino to showcase his determination, playfulness, innocence, and belief that anything is possible. 

I brought many versions of the story to my fabulous critique partners and Obi slowly became a recognizable character. Then, when I took The Craft and Business of Writing Picture Books at The Children’s Book Academy during the summer of 2018, the Academy’s founder, Dr. Mira Reisberg – who also became the editor and art director for OBI’S MUD BATH – fell in love with Obi and she, along with a critique group I was paired with in the class (which included you, Tina!), helped me define his voice further.

Dr. Reisberg selected and worked with Obi’s super talented illustrator, Folasade Adeshida, who mirrored Obi’s voice in her illustrations. The little rhino’s expressions, body language, and movements created by Folasade perfectly paired with the voice my words had given him. The result was a character that readers could get behind!

TS: The unfolding of the illustrating process is so exciting! I loved meeting Obi in your early drafts. OBI’S MUD BATH is inspired by true events that took place in Zimbabwe. Could you share with us the connection?

AS: The idea for OBI’S MUD BATH began while I was reading a news article. On a scorching, hot day in Zimbabwe, a little rhino bull named Mark was searching for juicy greenery. Unfortunately, there was litter on the ground. His snout and horn became stuck in a tire, and he couldn’t eat or drink. A team of vets came to his rescue and, thankfully, Mark made a full recovery.

The scene kept playing in my mind. I pictured the little rhino full of determination, exhausted, and then finally free. I envisioned a picture book that was not only fun to read, but that could also give back to help the environment. And Obi was born!

This is an example of how anything can spark a story idea and lead to something wonderful.

I wanted the book to make a difference on a larger scale, and a portion of the proceeds from OBI’S MUD BATH will be donated to Water.org, an organization which empowers families around the world with access to safe water and sanitation. Check out: Shop to Support .

To ensure that the book represented an accurate depiction of the landscape, wildlife, cultural appropriateness, and language of the area, Esau Mavindidze, a native of Zimbabwe and Shona language expert, was instrumental as a cultural sensitivity reader for OBI’S MUD BATH. Thank you Esau!

TS: What an amazing experience to have Esau share his insights! Obi’s new friends are a diverse group of characters. How did you decide on these specific ones to compliment Obi’s character and challenges?

AS: Yes, Obi’s friends are certainly fun! They added another layer to the story and were crafted to help with pacing.

I researched animals found in Zimbabwe that were not predators of each other. There was no room for a scuffle!

Each of Obi’s friends also has a distinct voice. The language they use, paired with their movements, tells readers a lot about them. They all add value to Obi’s quest.

Rufaro, the ostrich, is gentle and offers Obi comfort.

Tenda, the giraffe, has better eyesight and a longer neck than Obi, to search for a mud bath.

Moyo, the elephant, is older and sympathizes with Obi.

Let’s face it, we all need buddies to help us out occasionally. Showing readers the friends working together – teamwork – was an important concept to include. This is what leads Obi to come up with a solution to his problem.

TS: I agree! What do you hope will be the reader’s lasting impression or message learned from reading Obi’s story?

AS: I hope reading OBI’S MUD BATH leaves readers thinking about:

A determined young rhino…teamwork…believing…taking care of our environment…and, ooey, gooey mud!

TS: Thank you for sharing with us your process for showing such an important character like Obi!

Annette Schottenfeld is the author of Obi’s Mud Bath (Spork – Clear Fork Publishing), illustrated by Folasade Adeshida and Not So Fast, Max: A Rosh Hashanah Visit with Grandma (Kalaniot Books), illustrated by Jennifer Kirkham.

Annette is passionate about writing for children, hip-hop dance, and environmental issues, believing all have the power to change lives. A registered dietitian and expert baker, she created the decadent Uglie Muffin. Shhh, the recipe is a secret! Annette lives in New York with her husband and two kids.

You can find Annette online on TwitterFacebook, or annetteschottenfeld.com.

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3 thoughts on “Showing Through Real World Issues”

  1. Congrats on your sophomore picture book, Annette! I love that you use Obi’s voice for good in the real world, both in spreading the environmental issue and raising funds. Way to go! Great interview, Tina!

    Like

  2. What a great interview! Thank you Annette for sharing about voice, about how the news article sparked the idea, and how you ran with it and developed Obi and the other characters and also included environmental issues – which are very close to my heart as well! Sounds like a book i must read!

    Like

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